High Fructose Corn Syrup and Kidney Stones

I’ll be as succinct and as blunt as I can be:  high fructose corn syrup gave me kidney stones.

For nearly ten years, I got kidney stones about once per year, on average.  Kidney stones are probably the most painful thing I’ve ever experienced, and I tried an awful lot of things before arriving at this conclusion.  Eliminating high fructose corn syrup from my diet has eliminated my kidney stones — for several years now.

I’m well aware that anecdotal evidence is not scientific, and I’m just an uncontrolled sample of one, but in my case, there’s no room for any doubt whatsoever.  There’s evidence beyond myself, however, such as the here, here,  and here.

This is prompted by this widely aired, misleading pack of lies:

High Fructose Corn Syrup Advertisement

I reject the assertion that it’s “all natural,” since it’s highly chemically processed, and I also reject the assertion that “like sugar, it’s fine in moderation.”  It’s probably fine in moderation; I can probably slip and have some every now and then without having a kidney stone, but I don’t have to avoid either sugar or honey.

I also object to this sort of snarky advertising — it implies that everybody with an objection to high fructose corn syrup does so on the basis of unfounded rumor that they cannot articulate.  And the answer?  “It’s made from corn!”

Asbestos is all natural, for heaven’s sake, so it’s hardly a strong argument that something that’s natural must be good for you.  It’s also somewhat misleading, because high fructose corn syrup certainly doesn’t appear anywhere in nature, it’s purely an artificial product.

It’s also a political ad, since it’s produced by the “Corn Refiners Association,” which is a group pushing its agenda in Congress.  Shouldn’t it be properly labeled as a political ad?

Tobacco is just as natural a product.  You can pretty much just mentally fill in “tobacco” for everything in the ad and you can see where I’m coming from.

I highly recommend avoiding corn syrup, particularly if you’ve ever had a kidney stone.

And to you, Corn Refiners Association, for shame.  I sincerely hope your thinly-veiled political ads cause a massive backlash, and that consumers educate themselves about the real danger of your health-damaging products.

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5 Responses to High Fructose Corn Syrup and Kidney Stones

  1. Raccoon says:

    My mom found out that she is allergic to corn and corn products.

    Good luck avoiding HFC because it is *everywhere*.

  2. Carla says:

    At least it didn’t give you renal failure. After doing a years worth of research and reading I have come to the conclusion that fructose in general and HFCS in particular is the reason my kidneys have failed. I was a heavy consumer which I guess was my fault but I have aso been reading that the food being produced by the food/restaurant industry is addictive because of all the sugar/fat combo meaning HFCS/sugar combo. You can’t pay me to touch the stuff now. I occassionally passively consume it when I get something from the cafeteria at work otherwise I cook all my own food or only eat food that is fructose/HCFS free. A little too late since I need a transplant, but better late than never.

  3. E. says:

    One thing that REALLY pushed my kidney function off the edge was eating fruit for three months the summer of 2008. Another was high levels of fear in regards to social interaction and finances. However, some kidney herbs have recovered a large portion of my kidney function. I’m now reading a lot about hereditary fructose intolerance. It’s more common than the articles would have us believe.

  4. Diane says:

    Actually, they cannot even claim corn is all natural anymore, since corn is known to be one of the GMOs accepted on the American market. And if you think the companies producing these genetically modified foods don’t actually know their dangerous, then ask yourself “why are they giving so much money to congress to avoid labeling and to make it difficult for consumers to sue them.” Do you actually believe it’s because they KNOW these foods are safe? I too have suffered many painful uric acid kidney stones before eliminating HFCS from my diet. Eliminating HFCS pretty much eliminated my kidney stones and my blood urea levels which were 9 times higher than the normal level for a male (I’m female btw) have returned to a more acceptable level. So, pretty much anything that comes out of the “corn growers association” is thrown over in the BS pile by me and my family. Fortunately, more companies are listening and while they may not label their GMOs, many are quick to label their products with “100% pure cane sugar” which is what I now look for.

  5. Albert Ozburn says:

    I completely agree with you about High Fructose Corn Syrup. I too had Kidney Stones and Gout. I stopped the HFCS (as much as I could because it is in everything) about 4-5 years ago and my kidney stones decreased to the point that I don’t think that I have had any in a while. I have had some back pain that may or may not be attributed but nothing like i used to have with HFCS. I have a bad back from an auto accident so I think that is the majority of my pain now.
    I honestly believe that possibly within my lifetime, there will be major lawsuits such as in the tobacco industry with nicotine. I think the big boys like Coca-Cola and Pepsi ought to heed my advice because, like a train, it’s coming. I used to drink a lot of Coca-Cola and I think that was a direct contributor to Kidney stones and Gout. I occasionally get gout but try my best to stay away from HFCS. The only reason I found out about the correlation of bad health and HFCS was listening to the radio when Dr. Joe Esposito talked about it ( drjoeesposito dot com ). He is a major opponent of HFCS in the diet.
    I have to run but great info.
    Sincerely, Albert

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